The Polygon Studio | Jeffery S. Poss and WORKUS

The Polygon Studio, a sculpture studio and guesthouse with a zigzagging roof. It has 409 sq ft on the ground floor plus a loft bedroom. | www.facebook.com/SmallHouseBliss

This little building is used as a sculpture studio. It seems appropriate then that its architects would give it an abstract sculptural shape with a zigzagging roof. Galvanized steel cladding runs up one wall and onto the roof where it is folded into a pair of asymmetrical gables–besides extending lower on one side, that roof plane is also subtly steeper than the others. Although not designed to be a full-time residence, it looks like the Polygon Studio would make an amazing small house.

The Polygon Studio, a sculpture studio and guesthouse with a zigzagging roof. It has 409 sq ft on the ground floor plus a loft bedroom. | www.facebook.com/SmallHouseBliss

In addition to wanting a place to sculpt, the owners also asked architects Jeffery S. Poss Architect and WORKUS Studio to include space for overnight guests to stay. The architects devised a plan with three interconnected spaces: a two-story area for sculpting, a loft for accommodating guests, and, tucked under the loft, a service space with a cleanup area, storage and powder room. The loft and the double-height studio each occupy one of the gables, with the roof dipping low at the loft edge to define each space. The ground floor is 409 ft2 (38 m2) and the loft is a bit less than half that.

The Polygon Studio, a sculpture studio and guesthouse with a zigzagging roof. It has 409 sq ft on the ground floor plus a loft bedroom. | www.facebook.com/SmallHouseBliss

The Polygon Studio sits at the top of a steeply-sloped lot on Lake George in the Adirondack Mountains of upstate New York. Large glass doors at both levels face the lake, offering a filtered view through the trees. The doors at the loft level open to a balcony that cantilevers from the side of the studio.

The studio has a durable concrete floor. The walls are white to reflect light while the ceilings and loft are covered in cedar for warmth. The same cedar boards are used on the exterior gable walls. The lowest section of roof forms a deep overhang over the entry door. By placing an extra roof beam right at the wall, the architects were able to bring the overhang space into the interior, creating a display shelf above the door.

Have a great day!

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Images courtesy of Jeffery S. Poss Architect. Via Inhabitat.

Text copyright 2014 SmallHouseBliss. All Rights Reserved.

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