Modern vacation cabins at the Hölick Sea Resort in Sweden

This modern resort cabin in Sweden has a design inspired by camping tents. It has two bedrooms and a loft in 969 sq ft. | www.facebook.com/SmallHouseBliss

Hölick Sea Resort has operated for many years as a traditional tenting campground 300 km north of Stockholm. It sits at the tip of a peninsula, surrounded by sandy beaches and natural forest. The resort already had a few small cabins but the owners wanted to add some more modern cabins to appeal to a wider clientèle. They approached architect Mats Edlund, who collaborated with architects Henrietta Palmer and Matts Ingman to produce two designs, one of which is shown here.

This modern resort cabin in Sweden has a design inspired by camping tents. It has two bedrooms and a loft in 969 sq ft. | www.facebook.com/SmallHouseBliss

Inspired by the forest setting and the existing campground, the architects designed the cabins to resemble tents with sloping walls and uniform cladding covering both roof and walls. The resulting appearance is unique and playful without being outlandish. The wood roof finish is a traditional method called “faltak” borrowed from the Swedish island of Gotland. The wood covering helps to conceal the cabins among the surrounding pine trees. The architects had considered camouflaging the cabins by covering one wall in mirrors, but they decided to keep things simple and achieve that goal by sticking to natural materials instead.

This modern resort cabin in Sweden has a design inspired by camping tents. It has two bedrooms and a loft in 969 sq ft. | www.facebook.com/SmallHouseBliss

The interiors are kept light and airy with a wall of windows, light wood finishes and a vaulted ceiling. The 90 m2 (969 ft2) floor plan is compact and efficient, with an L-shaped living space wrapped around the entrance and adjacent bathroom. A modern 360 degree fireplace sits in the center of the living area.

There are two bedrooms at the low end of the “tent” and a sleeping loft at its peak, over the kitchen and bathroom. The sleeping loft is reached via a steep stair at the back of the kitchen. The interior wall between the living area and the bedrooms runs at an angle, giving more space to the living area and allowing a wider view.

Enjoy the photos!

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Photographs by Jacob Nordström, courtesy of Mats Edlund and Hölick Sea Resort. Via Dezeen.

Text copyright 2013 SmallHouseBliss. All Rights Reserved.

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