A tiny house designed for self-reflection | Allergutendinge

The "Spirit Shelter", a tiny structure designed for self-reflection, has lofted bed and study spaces that cantilever over the main floor. | www.facebook.com/SmallHouseBliss

Allergutendinge principals Matthias Prüger, Manuel Rauwolf and Ulrike Wetzel designed and built this tiny meditative retreat as a school project while they were students at Bauhaus University in Germany. They called the project “Seelenkiste”, roughly translated as “Spirit Shelter”. Like a monastic cell, the tiny house provides a minimalist living space for study, contemplation and self-discovery through meditation and introspection. At the same time, the limited space is supposed to make the occupants more aware of and in-tune with their physical environment.

Speaking of the physical environment, the Spirit Shelter contains a number of intriguing features that may or may not be practical for tiny house living. The split-level design puts the bed at mid-height between the ground-floor living space and the study room above. The front wall folds down to become a deck and the roof can likewise be opened, giving the occupants a direct connection to the surroundings. (A regular door would, however, be much more convenient during cold weather.)

The "Spirit Shelter", a tiny structure designed for self-reflection, has lofted bed and study spaces that cantilever over the main floor. | www.facebook.com/SmallHouseBliss

There is ample built-in storage, with the designers taking a “place for everything” approach. The minimal furniture can be stowed away and even the mini-kitchen — a backpacking stove and a basin fed by a water jug on the shelf above — folds away into the wall. The loft ladder is also integrated into the storage wall as a series of cubbyholes.

Images courtesy of Allergutendinge. Via Archello.

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